Downloads, Tips and Tricks for Gluten-Free Travelers

5 steps that will make packing up and shipping out easier on your stomach and your mind

by Sarah Forman | Mon, April 24, 2017

Living with Celiac disease or a gluten intolerance, things can often be more complicated than you'd like – especially when traveling. In your home, it's easy to maintain control, but out in the world, even the slightest mix up can cause massive amounts of discomfort. Here, we've pulled together five tips to ease the burden, helping to get you excited for your worry free adventure anywhere in the world.

1. Open kitchen

Open Kitchen Gluten Free Travel

When staying in smaller hotels, finding accomodations with open kitchens will give you the opportunity to prepare your own snacks or meals. By bringing tupperware with you, you can easily transport whatever you make, while avoiding all chances of cross-contamination.

2. Keep energized

Gluten Free Travel Snack

When you know you'll be moving around a lot, non-perishable, pre-packaged snacks will keep you energized and your stomach at bay. Having those on-the-go options is a risk-free way of ensuring that you've always got something in your back pocket – literally. 

3. Be flexible

Chinese Gluten Free Travel Card

In China especially, it's best to be flexible. Plain rice, sautéed vegetables and meat dishes are a safe bet, but if you're concerned about ingredients like soy sauce, it's best to communicate your illness with the card above – either print it out or save it to your phone, but this will help you communicate your needs so that others can help.

4. Carry your own

Soy Sauce

For an extra bit of flavor, carry your own Gluten Free Soy Sauce. It never hurts to have a stash with you!

5. Hire a guide

Gluten Free Meal

If you want to be adventurous without foregoing your security, you can hire a bilingual Chinese guide to help you arrange dining at restaurants. They may even be able to coordinate a homemade meal in local homes, giving you an incredibly personal, and personalized, experience. 

For traveling in other countries, be sure to check out celiactravel.com. This website has a list of 54 cards that explain your concerns and sensitivies in different languages, enabling you to communicate with hosts, hostesses and restaurant afficionados to make the most of your trip. I simple save or download can light a lot of weight from your shoulders.

To learn more about gluten-free living in Shanghai, click here.